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Thread: Firewood, regional differences

  1. #11
    Senior Member Scousers's Avatar
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    Best thing we ever did was to dump the chain saw, axes and kindling. Got rid of the log basket on the back. Bought a propane fire on Amazon...best $100 ever spent!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by D2Reid View Post
    When I started out I carried a chainsaw. Big he man was going to cut his own wood, chop it, kindle it; yeah baby, campfires!

    About 2 years in I sold the chain saw, just wasn't using it enough. I found it was a lot easier to pay $5.oo for a bundle of wood. Then I found out there is a big difference in the type of wood that is being sold, and another difference in how the wood was aged.

    We have been west of the Mississippi for quite some time, lots of pine. It light's quick and burns quick, you need lots of it. We have now ventured back east and have been camping in Alabama and Georgia, they sell a lot of red oak. Now red oak burns really good, but if it isn't aged for about 2 years it tends to be "wet" and hard to start. A bit frustrating when I am used to light and go. Saw a neighbor with some chem logs he used as starter, hilarious, burning a whole chem log just to get your firewood dried out and burning... anyway.

    Just thought I would throw this out there for a fireside chat...

    Attachment 30825
    I purchase most of my firewood from a local sawmill that specializes in high end wood pallets. Waste wood is sold dirt cheap... around $30 a pickup truck. I have to load it and split the bigger pieces but you can't beat the price for oak, hickory and ash. I pick up as many discarded pallets as I can. Purchased a wrecking bar to take them apart. Cut them on a chop saw and store in plastic containers. No bark on the wood. State parks love it.

  3. #13
    Site Team D2Reid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zymurgist View Post
    I pick up as many discarded pallets as I can. ... No bark on the wood. State parks love it.
    So long as you remove the metal from the pallets it makes great firewood. I have worked any many different state parks as a campground host, you know, the guy that cleans the campsites after everyone leaves. I gotta tell you picking nails out of a fire pit is not a job that anyone enjoys. And campers with nails in their tires are even less happy. It got so bad in Jonathen Dickinson State Park in Florida that they banned pallets completely.
    Dallas
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  4. #14
    Site Team WhittleBurner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zymurgist View Post
    I purchase most of my firewood from a local sawmill that specializes in high end wood pallets. Waste wood is sold dirt cheap... around $30 a pickup truck. I have to load it and split the bigger pieces but you can't beat the price for oak, hickory and ash. I pick up as many discarded pallets as I can. Purchased a wrecking bar to take them apart. Cut them on a chop saw and store in plastic containers. No bark on the wood. State parks love it.
    We used to get end cuts from a local mill , a close friend worked there and the supply was endless. Some of the best burning wood we had ever gotten.
    Cooking over brazilian cherry made some mighty fine steaks and burgers.
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  5. #15
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    No question wood varies at campgrounds. Out in the Smokies we bought some that was so green after 2 pitiful fires we gave it to the neighbors...couldn't start fires with it but probably ok if you had a good fire going.
    We will occasionally bring our own, but even that backfired once, but never bother to bring kindling. The chemlogs, at less than $2 a piece, do come in handy when you can't find any kindling material. Always add a dose of lighter fluid to ensure it gets off to a good start!

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  6. #16
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    Here in MN the state parks don't allow any outside wood unless it is certified as being local. What they sell at the park is usually the leftovers from harvested lumber. I'm sure there is a name for it but it's the thin outside bark covered pieces. They sell it for $6/bundle and it burns quick. It's a rip off. We usually go in search of a local who is selling some.
    Timmer
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  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by D2Reid View Post
    So long as you remove the metal from the pallets it makes great firewood. I have worked any many different state parks as a campground host, you know, the guy that cleans the campsites after everyone leaves. I gotta tell you picking nails out of a fire pit is not a job that anyone enjoys. And campers with nails in their tires are even less happy. It got so bad in Jonathen Dickinson State Park in Florida that they banned pallets completely.
    D2reid.... you would have appreciated me as a camp host. Yes, I burn pallet wood that has nails in it, but I don't leave my ashes or the nails in the fire pit. We carry a small shovel and galvanized bucket and place the contents of the fire pit in it before we leave. Usually, the campsite is cleaner when we leave than when we arrived. Over the past couple of years I have noticed a lot more trash being left behind. Some of the state parks aren't as well kept as they used to be. We do what we can to help.

  8. #18
    Site Team D2Reid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zymurgist View Post
    D2reid.... you would have appreciated me as a camp host.
    Thank you! The majority of campers are like you. Decent people raised to be decent people. Then there are the others....

    Not only do we host, but we are campers also. It is quite disheartening to pull into your reserved assigned camp site and find trash and debris laying about.
    Dallas
    2017 Momentum 376TH, 2019 Ford F450, Dual Rear Wheel, 4x4, diesel.
    2015 Harley-Davidson Street, XG750

  9. #19
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    Not a "wood" response, per say, but the best fire starter I've ever used is cotton balls partially soaked in Vaseline. Just go to your local Walmart, Target, grocery store, etc...buy the cheapest, house brand petroleum jelly they have...get the big tub! Then, take and melt it over low heat (outside!) and dip cotton balls about half way in the solution (don't soak completely, or they won't easily light). Set 'em on a sheet of foil to cool. Bingo, you now have a starter that lights easily and will burn for 5+ minutes. Depending on what I'm trying to get lit (use 'em for charcoals in a chimney starter too) you can use one or several. When I make 'em up, I usually do around a hundred and store 'em on one of those disposable containers you take your lunch in. Cheap and effective.

  10. #20
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    Haven't seen it mentioned here, but the best fire starter in the world is completely natural and harvested from pine tree stumps. It's called "Fatwood" and has a naturally high oil content. Starts super easy and burns a long time to get even the hard to start woods going. Once you've tried them, you'll never go back. I bought a box at this site 5 years ago and still have lots left, and I use it a lot. https://www.plowhearth.com/p/12213?a...gaAt14EALw_wcB

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