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  1. #1
    Left The Driveway
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    Going off road vs boondocking - are the Imagine's able to handle it

    Hi All,
    The DW and I have an Imagine 2600RB on order. Looking through the forums I have only seen one thread on taking this line "off-road" (not recommended) vs. just boondocking. We had a Lance that suffered frame damage so I wanted to get opinions. Where we boondock is BLM land 1 to 3 miles up an unimproved forest road and there are washout ruts, pitched sections of road, and some good dips and rock sections. The Forest Service no longer maintains the road. Not sure just taking it slow is the answer.
    Is the Imagine line (frame and axel set up) able to handle this type of abuse? We see pop-ups, 5th wheels, and toy haulers back where we go but few new travel trailers.

  2. #2
    Big Traveler
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billiam60 View Post
    Hi All,
    The DW and I have an Imagine 2600RB on order. Looking through the forums I have only seen one thread on taking this line "off-road" (not recommended) vs. just boondocking. We had a Lance that suffered frame damage so I wanted to get opinions. Where we boondock is BLM land 1 to 3 miles up an unimproved forest road and there are washout ruts, pitched sections of road, and some good dips and rock sections. The Forest Service no longer maintains the road. Not sure just taking it slow is the answer.
    Is the Imagine line (frame and axel set up) able to handle this type of abuse? We see pop-ups, 5th wheels, and toy haulers back where we go but few new travel trailers.
    I wouldn't take an Imagine or any GD trailer down that kind of road. These trailers have no suspension other than leaf springs. No shock absorbers at all. And there's very little compliance in suspension. If your intention is to go down fairly rough trails like that, I'd get a Black Series Camper that's designed for those kind of conditions:
    https://www.blackseriescamper.com/tr...lers/hq19.html
    2017 Ford F450 - our kids call her "Big Red"
    2018 Grand Design Reflection 28bh

  3. #3
    Site Team Second Chance's Avatar
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    I will agree with @TheLexx. The OEM suspension systems on GD RVs are not up to that sort of thing. My brother-in-law takes his smaller Reflection fifth wheel down Forest Service roads in New Mexico and Colorado to hunt, but he has made suspension modifications (beefed up spring hangers, wet bolts, shackles, etc.)

    Rob
    U.S. Army Retired
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    2012 F350 DRW CC LB Lariat PS 6.7
    2020 Solitude 310GK-R, MORryde IS, disc brakes,
    Sailun LRG tires, solar, DP windows, W/D
    (Previously in a Reflection 337RLS)
    Full time since 08/2015

  4. #4
    Left The Driveway
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    Thank you both, that was my take but I wanted to confirm. It is a wonderful design; I will look into the cost of upgrading the suspension. Do you think the frame will take it with the upgrades?

  5. #5
    Big Traveler
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billiam60 View Post
    Thank you both, that was my take but I wanted to confirm. It is a wonderful design; I will look into the cost of upgrading the suspension. Do you think the frame will take it with the upgrades?
    I'm kind of in the same situation as you are. There's no way to install a true off road capable suspension on these trailers. For one thing, the overhangs will make it near impossible for you to navigate the uneven terrain. Even if you beefed up your suspension, the tail will end up hitting the ground once your tires hit a culvert.

    Look at this video:


    From my research, your options are to go with:
    1) MorRyde Independent Suspension - this is a trailer arm type suspension using special rubber compression blocks. No shocks are involved. Cost starts at $4200 installed.

    2) Dexter TorFlex, Timbrens Silent Ride and other independent suspensions that use a trailing arm suspension and rubber compression blocks/rods. These are less expensive generally. https://timbren.com/p-35854-silent-r...3DALL%20MODELS

    3) Air Suspension - these would give you you you the best ride. I contacted the MorRyde rep and was told that they are coming out with a full independent air suspension. However the downside of these if you're off-roading and you get a rock wedged in the air bladder, you could get a leak.

    5) Roadmaster Comfort Ride using slipper springs and shocks - this is probably the most reasonable cost upgrade. It'll make the trailer ride much more smoothly. However this is NOT an off-road suspension and will not negate the fact that your trailer has inordinately long overhanges which will surely hang up on the ground somewhere when your suspension dips into a culvert. However so long as the trail is relatively even and flat, it may be ok.
    https://www.roadmasterinc.com/produc...mfort_ride.php
    2017 Ford F450 - our kids call her "Big Red"
    2018 Grand Design Reflection 28bh

  6. #6
    Site Team Second Chance's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheLexx View Post
    ... 1) MorRyde Independent Suspension - this is a trailer arm type suspension using special rubber compression blocks. No shocks are involved. Cost starts at $4200 installed.
    I would like to make some minor corrections to this: The MORryde independent suspension is "trailing link" suspension (just terms), but each wheel position has a shock absorber. The springs are rubber shear springs rather than compression.

    Rob
    U.S. Army Retired
    Widowed and very happily remarried
    2012 F350 DRW CC LB Lariat PS 6.7
    2020 Solitude 310GK-R, MORryde IS, disc brakes,
    Sailun LRG tires, solar, DP windows, W/D
    (Previously in a Reflection 337RLS)
    Full time since 08/2015

  7. #7
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    You'd be money ahead just getting a TT thats more capable. Outdoors RV makes off grid TT's that have the better frames, suspension and clearance built in.
    You'll pay more but you get more.
    Those Black Series are nice but are on the small side.

  8. #8
    Seasoned Camper
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    They're really made for the highways of North America, not the bush. That being said, I've taken all my trailers down unmaintained roads. I go slow, and I know the road beforehand. I don't scout with the trailer attached. And more often than not, I'm repairing something afterwards.
    2018 Dodge 3500 6.7 Cummins SRW w/Aisin
    2021 Reflection 303RLS
    We never really grow up. We just learn how to behave in public.

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