User Tag List

Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Left The Driveway
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Posts
    7
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Tow Vehicle Tire pressure

    Hi All,
    It's well documented to run your TT tires at their max cold PSI which I always do. I'm wondering if the recommended tire pressure in your truck changes with the amount of payload in the bed. The door sticker says the tires should be at 35psi while the max psi on the tires is 55. The rating indication on the sidewall of the tires says something to the effect of "the max load is XXX at 55psi" which suggests to me that in order for those tires to carry the maximum amount of weight they need to be filled higher than the generalized sticker says. Very curious to hear how others interpret this.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Site Team traveldawg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Florida Space Coast
    Posts
    1,886
    Blog Entries
    1
    Mentioned
    38 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It might help if you list some details about your truck.

    On mine the sticker says 60 psi in the front and 80 psi in the back.

    80 psi is also the max psi for the weight rating of my tires.

    I leave them at 80/60 all the time - loaded and unloaded.

    The best thing to do is to get the inflation table for your tires and see what psi's are recommended for specific weights and go from there.
    Larry
    2018 F350 SRW SB - AirLift 5000 w/Wireless One; ForScan; 37gal RDS Fuel Tank; Demco Hikacker
    2019 310GK-R - Sailuns; MorRyde SRE4000; Disc Brakes (StopYourTrailer.com); Electric Cord Reel


  3. #3
    Site Sponsor
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Fort Collins, Colorado
    Posts
    1,098
    Mentioned
    18 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by callagp7552 View Post
    Hi All,
    It's well documented to run your TT tires at their max cold PSI which I always do. I'm wondering if the recommended tire pressure in your truck changes with the amount of payload in the bed. The door sticker says the tires should be at 35psi while the max psi on the tires is 55. The rating indication on the sidewall of the tires says something to the effect of "the max load is XXX at 55psi" which suggests to me that in order for those tires to carry the maximum amount of weight they need to be filled higher than the generalized sticker says. Very curious to hear how others interpret this.

    Thanks!
    If you are worried about weight capacity, remember that the tires are only part of "the system", an important part. Your TV will list the RAWR (Rear Axle Weight Rating) on the drivers door jamb. This is the limit of the rear tires, wheels, springs, axle, and chassis.

    From your pressures (35 PSI) I am guessing you have P (passenger) tires. Going to LT tires (or just increasing your existing tire pressure) will give you more load capacity (as you have already figured out), but will also give you more stability in towing (less sidewall flex) but a stiffer ride.

    Chris
    Chris & Karen
    Fort Collins, CO
    2017 F-350 SRW 6.7 Lariat Value CC LB 4x4
    2018 Solitude 310GK

  4. #4
    Left The Driveway
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Posts
    7
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for the replies guys. The truck is a F-150 with Hanook Dynapro AT2 275/55R20 tires that have a 113 load index. They are rated for 2535lb at 51psi (mistyped in my original post, sorry). I looked on Hanook's site but didn't find an inflation chart, perhaps because they aren't LT tires?

    I guess all the years of driving "passenger" vehicles just created a mindless habit of blindly following the tire pressure sticker on the door. I understand the manufacturers of 1/2tons have to juggle comfort vs being a truck but why not have the sticker say psi depends on load. Or perhaps I'm just the last guy to come to this realization... Guess I'll start running them at 51 when towing and "air down" when daily driving if the ride is a bit too stiff.

  5. #5
    Seasoned Camper Cajun Couple's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Raceland, Louisiana
    Posts
    217
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by callagp7552 View Post
    Thanks for the replies guys. The truck is a F-150 with Hanook Dynapro AT2 275/55R20 tires that have a 113 load index. They are rated for 2535lb at 51psi (mistyped in my original post, sorry). I looked on Hanook's site but didn't find an inflation chart, perhaps because they aren't LT tires?

    I guess all the years of driving "passenger" vehicles just created a mindless habit of blindly following the tire pressure sticker on the door. I understand the manufacturers of 1/2tons have to juggle comfort vs being a truck but why not have the sticker say psi depends on load. Or perhaps I'm just the last guy to come to this realization... Guess I'll start running them at 51 when towing and "air down" when daily driving if the ride is a bit too stiff.
    Most 1/2 ton pickups come with P rated tires for a better ride and fuel economy. Tires also can be had in an XL rated version or LT tires that are offered on heavy payload or offroad versions. The 150 Ford tires I had were 275x55x20 Pirelli's rated at 44 psi max. I later put some LT 10 ply rated tires for heavier construction and the stiffer sidewalls when towing. I ran them at 40 to 45 psi to improve the ride for daily use. You're right about the inflation on the door jamb only being good for the stock tires. Change tires to an XL or LT rated one and those figures usually are voided.
    2018 Grand Design Solitude 377MBS

    2017 Ford F-350 Lariat DRW...FX4...4.10's...White Gold/Caribou with Black interior. Curt Q20 hitch. BakFlip MX4

  6. #6
    Site Sponsor
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    "Murvil", TN
    Posts
    1,352
    Mentioned
    38 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Here is an example for my F350 Dually. First, max psi on the sidewall of the tire is 80 psi. Sticker on the driver side door post lists the front tires at 75 psi, and the rear (four tires) at 65 psi. If inflated to that cold pressure numbers listed on the sticker, the tire capacity total is more than the GVWR of the truck...14,000 lbs. So there is no reason to inflate them any higher than the door sticker numbers....they are already more tire capacity than the MAXIMUM weight that the truck should ever be....14,000 lbs.
    2016 F350 CrewCab Dually
    2018 Momentum 394M....Got it!
    2019 Can Am Spyder RT
    Excessive Payload is a Wonderful Thing

    "If it ain't fast....It ain't Fun"

  7. #7
    Fireside Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Posts
    86
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by callagp7552 View Post
    Hi All,
    It's well documented to run your TT tires at their max cold PSI which I always do. I'm wondering if the recommended tire pressure in your truck changes with the amount of payload in the bed. The door sticker says the tires should be at 35psi while the max psi on the tires is 55. The rating indication on the sidewall of the tires says something to the effect of "the max load is XXX at 55psi" which suggests to me that in order for those tires to carry the maximum amount of weight they need to be filled higher than the generalized sticker says. Very curious to hear how others interpret this.

    Thanks!
    I had the same question with my new F-450. The sticker on the door said 90lbs. on the front tires and 80 lbs. on the rear, the tires said 110lbs. . I then texted Second Chance and he gave me the advice that with original stock tires, always go by door sticker, otherwise your trailer is too heavy not only for your tires but the rest of your truck .
    So this advice is assuming original stock tires.
    2021 F-450 King Ranch
    B&W Companion 25k Puck system
    2019 Solitude 385 GK
    2013 F-350 SRW (previous ); B & W 18k Companion Hitch (previous)

  8. #8
    Site Sponsor
    Join Date
    Mar 2021
    Posts
    331
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The Internet is awash with attempts to turn tire pressure into rocket science. The door stickers are relative o the tires that came from the OEM. When you replace tires, and if they are not the same as original, that sticker is useless.
    If you run the tires at the full cold pressure indicated on the tire, you get minimal rubber on the road, you get less sidewall flex, the tires run cooler, and thus are less prone to blowouts. There is no need to adjust the pressure to the load or trailer weight on the axles.
    2010 Jayco 26(SOLD)
    2011 Keystone Outback 277RL(SOLD)
    2021 Grand Design 268BH
    2013 Ford F250 XLT, 6.2L Gas

  9. #9
    Rolling Along
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Posts
    503
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    On heavy duty trucks the door sticker lists the inflation rating to give you the tow capacity for what your truck is rated. In my case it's 60 front 80 rear but that is an extremely rough ride if I'm not towing.

    After looking up the tire inflation chart and taking the truck across a CAT scale I can significantly lower the pressure when not towing. I have them inflated at 50 front and 45 rear when not towing and could even go another 5 psi less and still be within the spec of the tires for my unloaded weight.
    Charles and Susan
    2021 Ram 3500 Laramie, 6.4 Hemi, 4x4 CCSB
    2021 337rls w/ Andersen hitch.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

DISCLAIMER:This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by Grand Design RV, LLC or any of its affiliates. This is an independent site.