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  1. #1
    Left The Driveway
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    Next Question. Which Ford F-150?

    Okay, so I have not given up yet on the Armada or maybe even an Expedition. But, we are going out tomorrow to just SHOP for a tow vehicle. We need to look at & drive the F-150, but I'll be fighting it all the way.

    Looked it up in the Trailer Life Towing Guides anddddddd Good Grief.
    Are you kiddinggggg meeeee?

    How am I EVER going go to a salesman and say, "This is the F-150 I want to drive?"

    There are DOZENS (Maybe Thousands!) of configurations of F-150 trucks. I am not dense, but I haven't yet figured out what it is about the whole GVWR/Hitch Weight, etc. calculation that my brain is not computing. How will I know what F-150 I need? The camper is far away, so I cant go get the numbers off the side of it yet. So, will someone please explain? I feel pretty lost at this point. I'll end up driving something that won't pull my 2021 Imagine 2250RK.

    Forever Thankful &
    Abundantly Blessed...
    Ang

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by ASHLittle View Post
    Okay, so I have not given up yet on the Armada or maybe even an Expedition. But, we are going out tomorrow to just SHOP for a tow vehicle. We need to look at & drive the F-150, but I'll be fighting it all the way.

    Looked it up in the Trailer Life Towing Guides anddddddd Good Grief.
    Are you kiddinggggg meeeee?

    How am I EVER going go to a salesman and say, "This is the F-150 I want to drive?"

    There are DOZENS (Maybe Thousands!) of configurations of F-150 trucks. I am not dense, but I haven't yet figured out what it is about the whole GVWR/Hitch Weight, etc. calculation that my brain is not computing. How will I know what F-150 I need? The camper is far away, so I cant go get the numbers off the side of it yet. So, will someone please explain? I feel pretty lost at this point. I'll end up driving something that won't pull my 2021 Imagine 2250RK.

    Forever Thankful &
    Abundantly Blessed...
    Ang
    I drove a Titan XD for two years towing a small 5th wheel. The XD is a better towing platform than just about any F150. And it rides as smooth as an F150. Just my humble opinion after towing with both.

    I now tow with an F350 because our new 5th wheel exceeded the Titan's ratings...

  3. #3
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    https://www.ford.com/cmslibs/content..._F150_Dec3.pdf

    Big Ford guy here. Every F150 they have should be alright except the base 3.3 V6. I personally love the 2.7TT, but it has its place, and it isn’t towing a big trailer IMO. So that leaves the 5.0 V8 (I think you didn’t want this), the 3.5TT (very common), and the 3.5TT Hybrid. If fuel mileage is a concern, the hybrid is a significant difference when not towing. *Edit whoops, forgot the somewhat rare diesel. I’ve driven one, nothing wrong with it. Would do the job as well.

    Other things are to make sure the truck has, at a minimum, the Trailer Towing Package. Not to be confused with the Class IV hitch, which leaves out some stuff. Easy way to tell: does the truck have pro trailer backup assist (knob on the dash that controls backing up the trailer for you). The Ford trailer brake controller is worth optioning as well, but doesn’t need to be in the truck for you to test drive.

    Of course, if you find a Max Trailer Tow optioned truck, it’ll have all of that. None of them automatically come with trailer tow mirrors.

    With the ten speed transmission and the turbos, the rear gear ratio isn’t a huge deal. It has a slight affect on towing capacity (noted in the chart linked above) and acceleration.

    Otherwise, there is a yellow sticker in the drivers door that tells you payload capacity relative to what the truck weighed when it left the factory. Some of the higher optioned trucks will see this number get kind of small. Worth looking at. As a reference, my lowly XLT left the factory with ~1850lbs payload at a 7000lb GVWR. Lower GVWR packages will drop this number, but may have softer springs.

    The F150 hitch rating, in 2021, is 1400lbs. So it won’t be the limit like on an SUV. On my 2017 I believe it’s 1100lbs.
    Last edited by Stealth13777; 05-25-2021 at 09:11 PM.
    2022 Transcend Xplor 240ML
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boom 'r Bust View Post
    I drove a Titan XD for two years towing a small 5th wheel. The XD is a better towing platform than just about any F150. And it rides as smooth as an F150. Just my humble opinion after towing with both.

    I now tow with an F350 because our new 5th wheel exceeded the Titan's ratings...
    Funny you mentioned a Titan. Our only truck was a Titan. We couldn't wait to get rid of it.

  5. #5
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    Hi ASHLittle, I just joined this forum but may have some insight having just bought an F-150 and then the GD Imagine 2400BH RV. My friend is an avid RV camper and is a truck guy thru and thru. You are right about how many F-150 models there are. He directed me to the 2021 F-150 3.5L Ecoboost with the Max Tow package option (12,500 lbs). Plus we use the E2 weight distribution bars. It works great! I use it as a daily commute vehicle so it's better on gas than larger models (250, 350, etc) and it pulls the RV nicely. We just got back from our first 4 days trip (400+ miles total) and it did great! Hope that helps!
    Brian

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by ASHLittle View Post
    Funny you mentioned a Titan. Our only truck was a Titan. We couldn't wait to get rid of it.
    Sorry you had a bad experience with yours. Ours was an XD which is completely different than the normal Titan. Beefier frame, heavy load axles, larger brakes, heavier suspension, etc. It truly is a 5/8 truck. If I weren't towing a larger 5er, I'd be running back to the XD. And I like my F350...

  7. #7
    Site Sponsor sande005's Avatar
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    1. Look on the underside of the receiver. It will tell you the max weight it is rated for when using a weight distributing hitch.
    2. Your trailer has a max weight of 7495. 13% for tongue weight is 975, so that would be the max you should ever get to. If the receiver is rated for more, first hurdle passed.
    3. Take the 975, add in your guess for passengers and other stuff you might put in the truck. I'd also add in another 200 lbs for "just in case". This would be your payload guess.
    4. Look at the door sticker - if the payload is above the number from 3, you win. More capacity is far, far better, so be wary if there isn't much difference.

    The numbers above are all padded, so pretty unlikely you'll see that much payload. Real world weights would be better to use, but at this stage a guesstimate is the best we can do. But better to plan for and have more, than to discover you didn't buy a capable enough truck.

    After you are assured you have more than enough payload, start fussing over options and how much they can pull. They all can pull, and pull a lot. But many can't carry.
    2017 Imagine 2670MK
    2012 F-150 SCrew, Eco, 4x4 6.5 box
    Max. Tow, HD Payload, Airbags, ProPride hitch
    (Previous: Jayco 26.5RLS Fifth, Revolution Pinbox)

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by sande005 View Post
    1. Look on the underside of the receiver. It will tell you the max weight it is rated for when using a weight distributing hitch.
    2. Your trailer has a max weight of 7495. 13% for tongue weight is 975, so that would be the max you should ever get to. If the receiver is rated for more, first hurdle passed.
    3. Take the 975, add in your guess for passengers and other stuff you might put in the truck. I'd also add in another 200 lbs for "just in case". This would be your payload guess.
    4. Look at the door sticker - if the payload is above the number from 3, you win. More capacity is far, far better, so be wary if there isn't much difference.

    The numbers above are all padded, so pretty unlikely you'll see that much payload. Real world weights would be better to use, but at this stage a guesstimate is the best we can do. But better to plan for and have more, than to discover you didn't buy a capable enough truck.

    After you are assured you have more than enough payload, start fussing over options and how much they can pull. They all can pull, and pull a lot. But many can't carry.

    Okkkkkkaayyyy. I've got it. Don't ask me why your explanation hit home. But I got it.
    UNTIL YOUR LAST PARAGRAPH. LOL
    What in the world do you mean?
    How much they can pull???
    They can all pull a lot???
    But many can't carry???
    . Many what can't carry what?
    What does that mean? I'm serious. Trying hard.

    Thanks to each of you. I'm dead serious about needing to understand all aspects of this. I never thought I'd look so dense. I've been making light of all of it, because I think if you cant laugh, you're already defeated. I can follow your explanation, so I was rejoicing. Then your last comment stopped me in my tracks.

    Angie

  9. #9
    Long Hauler
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    Quote Originally Posted by ASHLittle View Post
    Then your last comment stopped me in my tracks.

    Angie
    Think of it this way: you, personally, can (probably) PULL (think drag across the ground) a 200 lbs weight; but you can't CARRY (in your arms) a 200 lbs weight. You can carry, in your arms, a 30 lbs weight. This illustrates what a tow vehicle can PULL, but not carry.

    The Cargo Carrying Capacity, or CCC, is the weight the tow vehicle can safely carry (the 30 lbs example). This does not include the weight of a full tank of fuel and all fluids, nor the weight of all passengers and cargo in the vehicle, nor the weight of the hitch.

    The 200 lbs represents the weight that the vehicle can pull.

    If you notice, there are several different weights listed on a trailer. The GVWR, which would equates to the 200 lbs example. The pin, or hitch weight, equates to the 30 lbs example.

    Hope this help clarify the "any vehicle can pull, but can't carry that much weight" comment at the end of his post.

    Sent from my phone using Tapatalk
    Last edited by MoonShadow_1911; 05-25-2021 at 10:37 PM.
    Mark & Mary. Full-timing across the USA (and Canada)!
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  10. #10
    Site Sponsor sande005's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MoonShadow_1911 View Post
    Think of it this way: you, personally, can (probably) PULL (think drag across the ground) a 200 lbs weight; but you can't CARRY (in your arms) a 200 lbs weight. You can carry, in your arms, a 30 lbs weight. This illustrates what a tow vehicle can PULL, but not carry.

    The Cargo Carrying Capacity, or CCC, is the weight the tow vehicle can safely carry (the 30 lbs example). This does not include the weight of a full tank of fuel and all fluids, nor the weight of all passengers and cargo in the vehicle, nor the weight of the hitch.

    The 200 lbs represents the weight that the vehicle can pull.

    If you notice, there are several different weights listed on a trailer. The GVWR, which would equates to the 200 lbs example. The pin, or hitch weight, equates to the 30 lbs example.

    Hope this help clarify the "any vehicle can pull, but can't carry that much weight" comment at the end of his post.

    Sent from my phone using Tapatalk
    Yep, sums it up well. "Tow rating" is how much the truck can pull behind it, for total weight. They all can pull an almost 7,500 lb trailer. Going higher generally means a more powerful engine and/or perhaps different gearing in the transmission. So more capable to pull that weight up a steep mountain road.
    "Payload Capacity" is how much can be put into the truck - how much the springs, axels, tires, etc. can carry. Depending on how it is outfitted, that can vary a huge amount. Can be as low as 1,400 lbs, to above 2.600 on an F-150.

    Many an RV'er has found to their dismay that the "Tow Rating" far exceeds the weight of their trailer (which is great!), but their truck "Payload Capacity" is below (or well below!) the weight the trailer (and other stuff, like passengers) puts on the truck - what it can carry. Most trucks can pull a huge amount. But many cannot carry the weight that puts on them. So reject any truck that does not exceed your projected payload capacity. ALWAYS favor the truck with the greatest payload capacity. If you have two with equal payload to choose from, then consider the one that has the higher "tow rating". But you'll likely find that they both have much higher tow capacity than you need, so you can fret over full leather, audio systems, fancy tailgates or all the other options instead.

    So an estimate of how much "Payload Capacity" you need is the very first criteria. In almost every case a truck meeting that criteria would easily be able to pull it.

    And - same thing goes for the Armada or Expedition! Check payload capacity first! Then look at tow rating, if they can carry the weight!

    [I would be remiss if I didn't complicate things for you. The capacity on the sticker is what it can handle when it came off the assembly line. Everything added after that reduces the capacity. That includes things a dealer or others may have installed, like running boards, bed liners (spray in or other), bed toppers, floor mats, etc. That can be hard to guess at, without taking it to a truck scale. Hence always good to exceed your target payload capacity by as much as you can find.]
    Last edited by sande005; 05-26-2021 at 08:14 AM.
    2017 Imagine 2670MK
    2012 F-150 SCrew, Eco, 4x4 6.5 box
    Max. Tow, HD Payload, Airbags, ProPride hitch
    (Previous: Jayco 26.5RLS Fifth, Revolution Pinbox)

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