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  1. #1
    Seasoned Camper
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    Factory suspension bolts last 3-5 years?

    Hey all,

    Have our 2022 Image into the dealer for some warranty work on the awning struts. We currently have just over 8k miles on it already and I asked them about replacing the suspension bolts to wet bolts and they told me the factory bolts should last 3-5 years.

    They want $750 just to replace with wet bolts ($200 for the parts, rest is labor) and this wouldn't even be an upgrade to say a Morryde suspension kit

    Besides finding someone else to do the work, any thoughts here?

    Rick
    2021 Chevy Silverado 2500HD
    2022 Imagine 2500RL

  2. #2
    Site Team traveldawg's Avatar
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    If you (or a friend) are relativity handy you can do it yourself.

    The hardest part is removing the old bushings. An air operated metal saw makes short work of them - just get easy - enough to break out the old bushings. Sometimes the bushings are sooooo bad they fall out.

    I doubt the bushings last 3 to 5 years. My wet bolts bushings didn't last 3 years (although I had 10's of thousands of miles on them.

    Else - find a garage locally and just pay the labor fee. I'd guess maybe 3 or 4 hours.
    Larry KE4DMG
    2022 F-350 SRW LB - Airlift 5000+, ForScan, 37 RDS Aux Tank,
    2019 310GK-R - Sailuns; MorRyde SRE4000; Disc Brakes; 20K Reese Goosebox


  3. #3
    Rolling Along
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    You can borrow the jacks stands and other tools for less than $750. Not a difficult task if you take it slow. Plenty of folks here to help you with the odds and ends. I tackled a wet bolt CRE3000 upgrade and it was not difficult at all.
    Randy and Kris

  4. #4
    Big Traveler
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    Depends on your 'mechanical ability'. Doing a wet bolt conversion is a 1 on a scale of one to ten...but if it's not the kind of thing you usually do....well...best get someone else.
    IMO, the original stuff will give you two years, max three, before you should be replacing in kind or replacing with wet bolt kit.
    2018 Dodge 3500 6.7 Cummins SRW w/Aisin
    2021 Reflection 303RLS
    We never really grow up. We just learn how to behave in public.

  5. #5
    Long Hauler
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    Hmm, I'd have to disagree with the difficulty rating. A 1 would be something that could be done with a hammer, screwdriver, and a pair of pliers. This project requires hand tools, specialized tools, and knowledge of what to do, I would put it at a 3. JMO of course.
    Howard and Peggy
    2019 Momentum 351M, and 2018 RAM Cummins dually 6-speed.
    His: 1999 Honda Interceptor
    Hers: 2013 Spyder ST-S

  6. #6
    Site Sponsor
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    I am fairly certain your Imagine, like mine, will have nylon bushings. I replaced mine last spring (year 2 prior to the season starting). We had approx 5,000 miles on it after a trip from MN to FL and back, otherwise, local outings. The bushings were shot, as in worn through. So, there won't be any effort in getting the bushings out if they are nylon.

    I am a moderate DIYer but never ever dealt with springs, wet bolts, etc. I did the work in about 10 hours total time. The first side was the longest but second side went pretty quick because I knew what I was doing by then. I put in heavier shackles, bronze bushing, and wet bolts. Doing that work gave me the confidence to then add Roadmaster Shock Absorbers which was also pretty easy and took about the same amount of time - although that doesn't require any jacks or even removing any wheels.

    Honestly, the hardest part of the bolts replacement was figuring out how to safely jack up the side of the rig so that both wheels could be removed, and have a jack to raise and lower one axle as you shift things to align things as needed. Once that was done the work (aside from some serious hammering on occasion) was not that bad. All depends on your capability and shape for sitting on the ground for long stretches.
    Last edited by Riverbug; 11-26-2022 at 04:08 PM.
    Chad
    2023 23LDE (Replaced 2022 22MLE)
    2022 F350 Carbonized Gray 6.7L Ultimate Lariat Pkg 4WD Crew Cab Short Bed 3.55EL Axle 3,566# Payload
    Adaptive Steering, Ultimate Camera Pkg, 20" Wheels, 397 Amp Dual Alternator

  7. #7
    Seasoned Camper
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    Thanks all for the encouragement

    I'm very mechanically inclined and would have no issues with tackling this project. I installed a 4 point automatic leveling system and many other upgrades on our previous Class C motorhome so this is within scale/scope and my abilities IMHO

    I don't have any jacks, stands and such so there's that, however for what the dealer wants to charge, that might just buy everything I need

    In fact, it's at the dealer now to repack the wheel bearings, labor alone for these 2 jobs is north of $1k... sounds like some new tools are in order

    Any recommendations on jacks/stands and any tips for properly lifting/supporting... such as, the coroplast needs to be removed or not... Don't lift by the axles being hollow...

    Thanks a ton
    Rick
    2021 Chevy Silverado 2500HD
    2022 Imagine 2500RL

  8. #8
    Site Sponsor
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    I have found for years that investing in the tools offsets the labor cost of someone else doing the work and leaves you with the proper tools for the future.

    No need to remove Coraplast. I had stacks of 6"x6"x2' timbers that I could lay down to set a floor jack on, lift a corner, put a jack stand under it, then move it all to the next corner. I hitched to the truck first to help keep it from moving and chocked the opposite side wheels. I have a couple of floor jacks so I also left one under the frame near where I was working as added safety along with the jack stands in the corners. A second floor jack setting on a couple of timbers was placed under one of the axles to raise and lower as you align leaf spring holes up to put bolts in, or relieve pressure as you remove bolts.
    Chad
    2023 23LDE (Replaced 2022 22MLE)
    2022 F350 Carbonized Gray 6.7L Ultimate Lariat Pkg 4WD Crew Cab Short Bed 3.55EL Axle 3,566# Payload
    Adaptive Steering, Ultimate Camera Pkg, 20" Wheels, 397 Amp Dual Alternator

  9. #9
    Rolling Along
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    I didn’t remove the coraplast. I use hockey pucks on my jacks and stands to give a flat resting spot. My 22MLE was tackled with a 6 ton jack and 5 ton jackstands. I used a 3 ton jack on the axles which you will need to align the bracket holes with the bolts. I also used a very large C clamp to squeeze the brackets together to insure the shoulder of the new bolt passed completely through the bracket. When the bracket is not squeezed you can run the risk of the shoulder not passing through and then tightening the nuts on the threads without the full bolt coming through. Other than lifting a corner, jackstand and lifting another corner and jackstand, it’s pretty tame from there. Electric impact is also great.
    Randy and Kris

  10. #10
    Rolling Along
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    Click image for larger version. 

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    Once I got a jack stand behind the rear spring hanger and in front of the front spring hanger, I removed the wheels and slid them under the trailer frame with some wood blocks on top of each for safety. Also, once on the stands, I used the bottle jack to support one axle and a floor jack under the other. One other trick is a 2x6 cut to fit between the axles to hold that exact distance while everything is loose.

    Of course, chock the other side.

    The only real “under the rv” work was to hammer the wet bolts into the spring hangers. Other than that, most of the work is from the side.

    Another tip is to have a bag of new wet bolt nuts as they are single use.

    The best part of DIY is that you know it is done properly.
    2021 Reflection 312 BHTS, Silverado 2500 Duramax

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